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Based on work by Blu-ray(TM) Optics

Transformers: The Movie (Limited Edition 30th Anniversary Steelbook) [Blu-ray]

$34.99


Cost: The price of DVD disc are much more cheaper than Blu-ray

HD DVD had a head start in the high-definition video market, as Blu-ray Disc sales were slow to gain market share. The first Blu-ray Disc player was perceived as expensive and buggy, and there were few titles available.

HD DVD had a head start in the high-definition video market, as Blu-ray Disc sales were slow to gain market share. The first Blu-ray Disc player was perceived as expensive and buggy, and there were few titles available.

The double feature will be available on Blu-ray in October.

Duplication involves using blank media and burning the data onto the disc as you would on your home PC, but on a much larger scale.

The reason the term "burn" is used is because the Blu-ray-writer, or burner, literally burns the data onto a writable Blu-ray. The laser in a Blu-ray writer can be cranked up to a more powerful level than an ordinary Blu-ray laser. This enables it to engrave thousands of 1's and 0's onto a disc.

The result is a perfect disc copy.

Replication involves pressing the disc which is done via a glass master. The polycarbonate is squirted onto the master so that the data is permanantly etched into the data layer. Reflective and protective surfaces are then added to allow a laser to pick up the information and give the disc durability. The result is the same as a bought disc from your local Bluray retailer.

The 1989 crime thriller will gun down Blu-ray in October.

The , chaired by , was split over whether to develop the more expensive blue laser technology or not. In March 2002 the forum approved a proposal, which was endorsed by and other . The proposal involved compressing HD video onto dual-layer standard discs. In spite of this decision, however, the DVD Forum's Steering Committee announced in April that it was pursuing its own blue-laser solution. In August, Toshiba and NEC announced their competing standard, Advanced Optical Disc. It was finally adopted by the DVD Forum and renamed the next year, after being voted down twice by DVD Forum members who were also Blu-ray Disc Association members—a situation that drew preliminary investigations by the U.S. Department of Justice.

The , chaired by , was split over whether to develop the more expensive blue laser technology or not. In March 2002 the forum approved a proposal, which was endorsed by and other . The proposal involved compressing HD video onto dual-layer standard discs. In spite of this decision, however, the DVD Forum's Steering Committee announced in April that it was pursuing its own blue-laser solution. In August, Toshiba and NEC announced their competing standard, Advanced Optical Disc. It was finally adopted by the DVD Forum and renamed the next year, after being voted down twice by DVD Forum members who were also Blu-ray Disc Association members—a situation that drew preliminary investigations by the U.S. Department of Justice.